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Hey,

I am trying to obtain information as to the type and production year of a 32-20 I purchased several years back. It seems that the original stampings on the left side have been "stamped" over but i am not sure. Also, the serial number on the butt (106738) of the handle differ from what is on the inside/above the ejector rod (18155). Clearly the grips are not original. Any identifiable information would be appreciated. Thanks.

IMG_3292.jpg IMG_3273.jpg IMG_3277.jpg IMG_3294.jpg IMG_3290.jpg
 

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The number on the frame that is revealed when you swing out the cylinder is an assembly number. This number is also on the yoke and most likely the inside of the side plate. The serial number is the number stamped on the butt of the grip frame. This number should also be stamped on the yoke edge facing the cylinder (viewable through the charge holes), the rear face of the cylinder, the front surface of the ejector star, and possibly the bottom of the rear sight tang. Even with the stamping on the barrel and refinish it looks like a nice K Frame target model revolver.
 

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make mine 45 acp 😎
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the places for sn match are on the butt of frame, barrel flat, cylinder face..

your revolver probably shipped in 1922

sights appear to be a bit suspect .. not sure if it is an original target model or fixed sight gun that was modified.
Note that factory target sighted 32-20's dont show up a lot, much lower production than the fixed sighted ones..

the funky T stampings on the barrel ive seen before, thought it was a foreign service mark but cant quite remember - maybe another member can assist
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info. I took a pic of the cylinder and it is the same serial number as the butt. However, the number on the barrel is different. IMG_3296.jpg IMG_3297.jpg
 

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So, the barrel has been replaced, either by the factory or a gunsmith. It is still a nice revolver and the various 32 caliber cartridges are building interest.

I have two of the Winchester Model revolvers and enjoy them.

Kevin
 

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Welcome to the forum!
Your revolver also appears to have been refinished, possibly an electroless nickel coating or one of the other newer types. Lots of rounded edges and softened stamping are the clues. The hammer and trigger look to be in original condition though. Front sight is filed back to mimic the later type fixed sights as found on the post war models.
But the real question is, how does it shoot?

John
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It shoots great! Amazingly tight mechanism for a gun that is roughly 100 yrs old. I bought this from an older gentleman who actually sand polished it down about 10 years ago. At the time I bought it, i thought the .32-20 caliber was a cool looking round for a pistol.
 

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welcome01 to the forums from the Wiregrass! The original magnum calibre. I thought the finish looked odd. So, it's in the white. As long as you keep an oil coat on it, it'll last another 100 years.
 

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Welcome to the forum! welcome01
 

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One thing I've noticed about these old S&W 32-20s: they are usually in very worn condition when compared to the 38 special M&Ps from the same era. That tells me they were a very popular revolver at the time. Sharing a cartridge with the Winchester 92 and other rifles may have had something to do with it as well. I love them, having 4 revolvers and two rifles chambered for the 32-20.

John
 
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