Smith And Wesson Forums banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
black powder shooter
Joined
·
4,130 Posts
early/mid 1960s by the look/sn#

looks like a Model 10, heavy barrel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,380 Posts
C prefix serial number puts it in the late 40's to mid 50's. It's a "Military & Police" model and is probably a little before model numbers were stamped on the frame as blazermark notes.

Usually police issue guns are stamped on the grip strap with issue/badge numbers. If your gun doesn't have that, it's probably not a department issue gun.

You can shoot any .38 special ammo in it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jeepnut

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,380 Posts
Should be visible on the outside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
C prefix serial number puts it in the late 40's to mid 50's. It's a "Military & Police" model and is probably a little before model numbers were stamped on the frame as blazermark notes.

Usually police issue guns are stamped on the grip strap with issue/badge numbers. If your gun doesn't have that, it's probably not a department issue gun.
C prefix serial number puts it in the late 40's to mid 50's. It's a "Military & Police" model and is probably a little before model numbers were stamped on the frame as blazermark notes.

Usually police issue guns are stamped on the grip strap with issue/badge numbers. If your gun doesn't have that, it's probably not a department issue gun.

You can shoot any .38 special ammo in it.
Thanks, that is very helpful. Is +p ammo appropriate?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,380 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,029 Posts
Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! Your gun should be stamped MOD 10-2 or 10-3 inside the yoke area. It was shipped in 1962 according to the SCSW, 4th Edition. The 10-2 change changed the thread on the extractor rod from right to left hand. All NYPD guns were stamped NYPD on the backstrap by S&W before shipping to the PD. So, if it is not stamped, it is unlikely to be a police revolver although it might have the same engineering configuration as they used. These guns were manufactured to shoot full load .38 Special (before the current reduced loading) and could also handle .357 Magnum loads as later made for other LEO agencies before the Model 13. You can shoot anything currently made including +P+ loads without breaking a sweat.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jeepnut

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,380 Posts
^^^ *Only if the chambers are cut to fit the longer .357 cartridge.

You can shoot anything currently made including +P+ loads without breaking a sweat.
You might sprain a wrist though. ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Rinkendorf

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
That's good information. I am looking forward to shooting it.

Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! Your gun should be stamped MOD 10-2 or 10-3 inside the yoke area. It was shipped in 1962 according to the SCSW, 4th Edition. The 10-2 change changed the thread on the extractor rod from right to left hand. All NYPD guns were stamped NYPD on the backstrap by S&W before shipping to the PD. So, if it is not stamped, it is unlikely to be a police revolver although it might have the same engineering configuration as they used. These guns were manufactured to shoot full load .38 Special (before the current reduced loading) and could also handle .357 Magnum loads as later made for other LEO agencies before the Model 13. You can shoot anything currently made including +P+ loads without breaking a sweat.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,029 Posts
^^^ *Only if the chambers are cut to fit the longer .357 cartridge.

I never said this model could chamber .357 cartridges, only that it was manufactured to be capable of handling them. The Model 13 was basically this gun modified with a deeper chamber for the .357 cartridge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
^^^ *Only if the chambers are cut to fit the longer .357 cartridge.

I never said this model could chamber .357 cartridges, only that it was manufactured to be capable of handling them. The Model 13 was basically this gun modified with a deeper chamber for the .357 cartridge.
Thanks, I plan to stick with standard .38 Spl
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
450 Posts
By the looks of it, this was definitely a police revolver. If you bought it anywhere around New York, there’s a good chance it was NYPD.

However, by the time of that serial you will not find any stamping on the gun indicating that it was an NYPD gun. All through the revolver era NYPD officers were required to purchase their guns, usually from the department’s Equipment Bureau, but also elsewhere as long as the model was on the (very short) approved list.

About 90% of officers bought the M&P/Model 10 in whatever the current iteration or dash-version was. That’s why so many of these are available on the collector market. Since these became the officers’ private property, none were ever stamped NYPD. Until the early- to mid-1950s, officers were required to stamp their shield number on the gun, usually the backstrap but sometimes squeezed in next to the butt serial; this practice faded away, and was gone by the time of your gun.

So only a history letter can confirm that the gun shipped to the NYPD.

488642
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,380 Posts
^^^ *Only if the chambers are cut to fit the longer .357 cartridge.

I never said this model could chamber .357 cartridges, only that it was manufactured to be capable of handling them. The Model 13 was basically this gun modified with a deeper chamber for the .357 cartridge.
Pressure wise sure, lengthwise no. Seemed kinda confusing as written, at least to me.
Love those Mod 13's though, a very underrated gun.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Rinkendorf

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,882 Posts
By the looks of it, this was definitely a police revolver. If you bought it anywhere around New York, there’s a good chance it was NYPD.

However, by the time of that serial you will not find any stamping on the gun indicating that it was an NYPD gun. All through the revolver era NYPD officers were required to purchase their guns, usually from the department’s Equipment Bureau, but also elsewhere as long as the model was on the (very short) approved list.

About 90% of officers bought the M&P/Model 10 in whatever the current iteration or dash-version was. That’s why so many of these are available on the collector market. Since these became the officers’ private property, none were ever stamped NYPD. Until the early- to mid-1950s, officers were required to stamp their shield number on the gun, usually the backstrap but sometimes squeezed in next to the butt serial; this practice faded away, and was gone by the time of your gun.

So only a history letter can confirm that the gun shipped to the NYPD.

View attachment 488642
Thank you for that information, very interesting and helpful!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
569 Posts
C prefix serial number puts it in the late 40's to mid 50's. It's a "Military & Police" model and is probably a little before model numbers were stamped on the frame as blazermark notes.

Usually police issue guns are stamped on the grip strap with issue/badge numbers. If your gun doesn't have that, it's probably not a department issue gun.

You can shoot any .38 special ammo in it.
Police guns are not always marked in any way. I have a 1940 shipped M&P that went to the Sacramento PD. No markings at all, and the 6" revolver appears to have never been used. It was in a one gun shipment. Big Larry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
450 Posts
It always depends on whether the guns were department-owned and issued or whether the officers were allowed/required to purchase their own.

Department-issued guns are much more likely to have an identifying stamping, sometimes accompanied by an inventory number; they usually don‘t have anything identifying the individual officer.

On the many privately purchased guns, you‘re generally not going to find any markings unless the owner decided to add a personalization. I have the 1923 M&P below which was part of a shipment to Minneapolis PD, but then appears to have become the officer‘s personal property; the name and department hand-engraved on the sideplate are certainly not official.

Policies like the old NYPD practice which required shield number stampings on guns privately owned, are an exception.

489056
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top