44 S&W Special hand ejector cleaning
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Thread: 44 S&W Special hand ejector cleaning

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    44 S&W Special hand ejector cleaning

    Can anyone give me some advice on a way to clean and remove the pitting from this revolver. I was told it left factory in 1927. Not sure what the finish is. Can I strip and blue the trigger and hammer? I don’t want to restore but I want it as good as I can get it in terms of aesthetics. Also any other information on it would be greatly appreciated.

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    Last edited by Coleg1121; 01-13-2020 at 09:07 AM. Reason: Pictures did not post
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    Only way to strip nickel without further damage to steel is by reverse-electrolysis. Don't let any incompetent hack tell you it can be done with acid; too bad I don't still have the gun that was ruined that way, or I'd show you the results.

    This piece, in my opinion, is worth spending what it costs to do the job right.

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    The "blue" on the hammer and trigger are the remains of color case hardening. You don't want to remove that.

    A decent plating shop should be able to strip, polish and replate the nickel parts of the gun. You don't want to plate the hammer, trigger or ejector star.
    Last edited by delcrossv; 01-13-2020 at 10:38 AM.
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    Thanks adirondacker, so best to have it professionally done? Do you have any more info about this particular piece? Or know where I can find it? Having trouble on internet. Also have a large dent in cylinder cheek. Can this be repaired? Will any of this decrease value of the gun? Thanks a lot!

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    Thanks delcrossv, I have already soaked trigger and hammer in hops no.9. Is this ok? Should I re-blue? Will refinishing hurt value of gun if there’s any value at all? Greatly appreciate your advice.

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    Not a lot of collector value in that condition, so if you want to have it replated, go for it. Hopps 9 won't harm the hammer or trigger, but nickel doesn't like the ammonia in it. I'd just clean and oil the trigger and hammer.

    ATF works better for removing rust. Soak, then rub with bronze (not steel) wool.


    Got a picture of the ding in the cylinder?
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    Yes sir. It’s hard to see but it’s right there on the top (or outside) of the shroud.

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    Thanks for your help

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    That "dent " is normal.
    It is supposed to be there and is in fact a guide for the cylinder pin to ride in when closing.
    With the cylinder reinstalled you will immediately see it's purpose . It just looks funny when the cyl. is removed.
    Last edited by needsmostuff; 01-13-2020 at 11:54 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by delcrossv View Post

    A decent plating shop should be able to strip, polish and replate the nickel parts of the gun.
    Yes, but where do you find one? I specifically asked the rotten SOB who ruined my gun with acid if he used reverse-electrolysis, or I'd never have sent it to him in the first place; bastard probably said "yes" because he had no idea what I was talking about. And this was a shop that advertised in the Gun List as specializing in gun work of all kinds! Don't remember the name of this SOB, but it's probably good that he was in Fl, too far away for me to get my hands on him, otherwise I might be sitting in a cell right now.

    The gun is going to have to be completely polished anyway (hopefully, by someone who knows HOW), so I'd just have it blued; re-plating just introduces another level of complexity. As far as originality goes, that can't be recovered, whatever is done.
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    Quote Originally Posted by delcrossv View Post
    I'd just clean and oil the trigger and hammer.
    If it were a blued gun, that's what I'd say too; but there's nothing uglier than deteriorating nickel-plating. One thing for sure: either spend the money for a 1st class refinishing job, or leave it as is; have the work done by the neighborhood gun-butcher, & not only have you lost whatever that job cost, but you end up with a gun worth LESS than it's worth right now.
    Oldgungeezer and Davwingman like this.


 
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