Help on age and possible value
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  1. #1
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    Help on age and possible value

    I inherited a .38spl CTG from my recently passed grandfather. I know he was issued it as part of the Civil Defense program. Originally was blued and wood gripped. They allow them to send to S&W to nickel plate and pearl grip for free which did. It is stamped US Property G.H.D. with serial number V 353xxx. Has miniminal scratches. Don't plan on ever selling it as it is a part of history he was a part of as well as sentimental value. What is the age and approximate value? Thanks for reading through the prologue and your time.
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  2. #2
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    Also he prolly never shot more than a box of shells through it other than the drills and target practice they had.

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    Welcome to the forum.

    By the serial it was a standard mid-war (1943) Victory.

    I certainly don’t like to cast doubt on your grandfather‘s story, but S&W did not as a matter of policy accept Victorys for finish changes, and the gun is missing its swivel and has non-factory grips, so I would think it very unlikely that this is a factory modified gun. The concept that any official agency would allow issued gun to be personalized like this also would be unusual. It is much more probable that he acquired it after Civil Defense surplused it out and had it commercially refurbished.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Absalom View Post
    Welcome to the forum.

    By the serial it was a standard mid-war (1943) Victory.

    I certainly don’t like to cast doubt on your grandfather‘s story, but S&W did not as a matter of policy accept Victorys for finish changes, and the gun is missing its swivel and has non-factory grips, so I would think it very unlikely that this is a factory modified gun. The concept that any official agency would allow issued gun to be personalized like this also would be unusual. It is much more probable that he acquired it after Civil Defense surplused it out and had it commercially refurbished.
    +1

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    Thanks for the help. That's what I thought odd no swivel and that they'd do that for them. Maybe he told us that so grandma wouldn't get mad at him for "pimping" it out.
    Last edited by hobart87; 09-17-2019 at 07:09 PM.
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    Thanks for your time. Possibly one of the guys had a connection that plated it. So does the non factory grip detract from value, just curious what it would go for on an action site. Plan on keeping. Just wondering the value being an earlier Victory model. Also a is it a Victory model 10 or premodel 10? Hard to dig up some of this info. Get conflicting data from different sources. But yall are the S&W historians much more than I.

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    Replated, buffed out Victory? $150-200. You'll get more enjoyment out of just shooting it.
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  9. #8
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    Thanks! Plan on it love the crisp double action and haven't got to the range yet. Looking forward to it.
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  10. #9
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    Welcome to the forum. Since nothing is original, the real value is to you as it is your grandfathers gun.
    Waidmann, ArkieVol and Curt360 like this.

  11. #10
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    I'll bet those grips are Jay Scott brand. They have the look, over-the-counter/mass produced. I have to agree with all above. Heirlooms should be preserved as received, enjoyed, then passed along. There were a million plus WWII S&W .38's, dolling them up them up post-war into the 1960's was very common. At least this one was not bubba butchered as many were.

    P.S. the factory would not have plated the hammer or trigger. If it were returned to the factory it be stamped with an open five pointed star with the month/year the work was done (i.e. 4.46).


 
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