My First Journey on the Inside....
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  1. #21
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    I've pulled the side plate off of a couple, but I'm always scared that I'll booger it up putting it back on. When I put a "stupid scar" on one it drives me nuts every time I look at it. Just my CDO kicking in I guess (that's OCD in alphabetical order as it should be).
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  2. #22
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    I always recommend Jerry Miculek's "Trigger Job" video for anyone who wants to work inside S&W revolvers. The video has good close-ups of the small parts, and it gives good coverage of assembly and disassembly. It shows what areas can be smoothed, and most importantly, which areas should not be touched. Even if you don't want to touch parts with a stone, I think this video is a useful introduction to the internals of S&W revolvers.

    I have also taken a look at most of the revolver trigger job videos on youtube, and I cannot recommend any of them. Some of them do have good info, but every free video I have seen also has problems. In my opinion, it is worth paying for Jerry's video.

    Note, that Jerry has also made a Disassembly and Reassembly video. I have not watched it, but I can say that these areas are well covered in the Trigger Job video, so I think that one is sufficient.

  3. #23
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    Im glad you didnt have any parts left. I have to open all of mine. You never know what you might see. The scratches and badly ground cylinder release were not done by me, but the jeweling is cool.

    Last edited by SkullAero; 02-03-2020 at 09:20 PM.
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    Regards, Bert W.

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  5. #24
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    Since I didnt have parts left over after messing with my 617, I decided to peek inside a J frame
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    Other than the main spring its pretty much the same as the bigger guns. This M60 Pro has a pretty heavy trigger pull and hasnt been shot much. I polished the rebound slide and where it rides in the frame. This reduced the trigger pull by only 3 or 4 ounces but made it much smoother
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  6. #25
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    There are other surfaces in there that cause friction... now that you're experienced & all.
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    "He that hath no sword, let him sell his garment & buy one" Jesus - Luke 22:36

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Injunbro View Post
    There are other surfaces in there that cause friction... now that you're experienced & all.
    Indeed there are. I have been reading and watching videos, which I realize isn't the same as real training. There are a couple other spots I am willing to smooth up and some others I know enough to stay away from. If you want to come to beautiful, but usually cold and snowy Pennsylvania to give me an expert lesson I do have a spare room
    The hammer block was really rough on the M60 so I also polished up the surfaces where it contacts the frame

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonesy814 View Post
    Indeed there are. I have been reading and watching videos, which I realize isn't the same as real training. There are a couple other spots I am willing to smooth up and some others I know enough to stay away from. If you want to come to beautiful, but usually cold and snowy Pennsylvania to give me an expert lesson I do have a spare room
    The hammer block was really rough on the M60 so I also polished up the surfaces where it contacts the frame


    I've been to Pennsylttucky 40 or so years ago... still ain't finished thawing out. Now if you showed up in God's country (SE AZ)...
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    "He that hath no sword, let him sell his garment & buy one" Jesus - Luke 22:36

  9. #28
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    In my opinion, one of the key areas to polish in a J frame is the strut which supports the mainspring. I believe the official name for the strut is the "mainspring stirrup". It can be a significant source of friction since all the coils of the spring rub against the stirrup as the spring is compressed. Also the sides of the stirrup that the spring rides on do not need to be maintained with precision tolerances, so there is not much risk in polishing there. You can also smooth up the top of the stirrup where it fits into the hammer.

    One of the advantages of the larger frame Smith revolvers is that the leaf mainsprings do not have friction on anything as they compress. There are a number of reasons why a J frame will not have as good a trigger as a larger frame revolver, but smoothing the stirrup is at least a start.

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by StraightShooterJake View Post
    In my opinion, one of the key areas to polish in a J frame is the strut which supports the mainspring. I believe the official name for the strut is the "mainspring stirrup". It can be a significant source of friction since all the coils of the spring rub against the stirrup as the spring is compressed. Also the sides of the stirrup that the spring rides on do not need to be maintained with precision tolerances, so there is not much risk in polishing there. You can also smooth up the top of the stirrup where it fits into the hammer.

    One of the advantages of the larger frame Smith revolvers is that the leaf mainsprings do not have friction on anything as they compress. There are a number of reasons why a J frame will not have as good a trigger as a larger frame revolver, but smoothing the stirrup is at least a start.
    Thanks, I was going to look at that. I know the mainspring strut in my SP101 was really rough and smoothing it out really improved the smoothness of the trigger pull

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Injunbro View Post
    I've been to Pennsylttucky 40 or so years ago... still ain't finished thawing out. Now if you showed up in God's country (SE AZ)...
    We've changed! Honest we have! It hasn't hardly been cold at all. We are running a good 20-25 degrees above normal for this time of year. Wife had the window open the other day, and I could smell something good on the grill somewhere in the neighborhood. You must be thinking of the Pre-Global Warming Pennsylvania


 
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