Turret press users question.
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  1. #11
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    I used the same procedure as Jonesy for a good while until I got squib loads on a few occasions. I suppose that I could slow the process enough to check each case for powder but, that would seem to be counter productive. My solution was to change my loading procedure. I purchased a Lyman Gen 6 powder measure to ensure the correct charge going into each case. I removed the progressive feature from the press and set up a cartridge tray with my cleaned brass. Each case is resized, decapped, a new primer pressed in, and then replaced in the tray. The Lyman scale is set to the proper charge and each case is then neck expanded and the powder charge added. I then check each case to ensure that an equal amount of powder is in each case. To complete the process, a bullet is seated and then crimped until all cartridges are loaded. Sure, it takes a while longer but, this way I am assured of a safe load. Time isn’t an issue for me since I am retired but safety is and I can load at my leisure.
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  2. #12
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    Watching TV or listening to the radio during any part of the reloading process isn't something I do .
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  3. #13
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    I have a Lee 4 hole turret press. For straight walled pistol cartridges I use the auto-indexing feature on the turret, which works great with the auto-disk powder measure. For precision loading for my rifles, I do one step at a time.

    Hector
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  5. #14
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    When I teach reloading, we bring a Redding T8 press into the class room for "reloading lab" in class. We actually reload rounds as part of our class, and go down to the range to shoot and chronograph them.

    Our informal "competition" is to have the smallest standard deviation of velocity between 5 rounds loaded by each student.

    We load the rounds on the Redding in passes, first sizing and decapping and hand priming all the brass, then manually weighing and loading powder using a beam scale, then inserting the bullets on the press. We then use a gauge to measure each round. We don't taper crimp in the class, but that would be another pass at home.

    This is probably the most efficient way to proceed with a turret press. It allows time to visually check all the rounds in a cartridge tray for powder level before the pass of inserting bullets.

    I have always 100% visually checked powder level on rounds before bullet insertion on either a turret or progressive press. Here's a video showing my setup at home on my Hornady progressive press:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIraXq6u0VY

    Thewelshm and SidecarFlip like this.
    Cheers! Marc


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  6. #15
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    Thanks for the replies. It seems that there is some time savings. My first thought was that handgun ammo is easy to reload. Just wander through the steps and out pops a loaded cartridge. What makes it tedious is the number of time you need to handle a case. Rifle on the other hand is technical and requires more care. I was glad to hear flip say that there is no flex in the turret. I would think flex there could cause inconsistent quality. Interchangeable turrets seem to be a bonus. I have two dedicated tool heads for 9x19 and .45 ACP for my Dillon. I’m not sure I would like the powder measure being jostled around while moving the turret though. It would seem to me that the potential for inconsistent powder charges would increase every time you move the turret and “settle” the powder.

    I don’t want anyone to think that this is a Dillon vs. turret thread. I was simply curious as to how they were used. It seem while they are not as fast as a progressive press, they are faster than a single stage. Thanks again for the input.
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  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ratzo View Post
    Thanks for the replies. It seems that there is some time savings. My first thought was that handgun ammo is easy to reload. Just wander through the steps and out pops a loaded cartridge. What makes it tedious is the number of time you need to handle a case. Rifle on the other hand is technical and requires more care. I was glad to hear flip say that there is no flex in the turret. I would think flex there could cause inconsistent quality. Interchangeable turrets seem to be a bonus. I have two dedicated tool heads for 9x19 and .45 ACP for my Dillon. I’m not sure I would like the powder measure being jostled around while moving the turret though. It would seem to me that the potential for inconsistent powder charges would increase every time you move the turret and “settle” the powder.

    I don’t want anyone to think that this is a Dillon vs. turret thread. I was simply curious as to how they were used. It seem while they are not as fast as a progressive press, they are faster than a single stage. Thanks again for the input.
    The movement of the turret and powder measure has no effect on the powder charge.

    A turret press is only faster than a single stage as you do not need to pick up the same brass 3 or 4 times. Batch loading on a single stage is still the same "pulls" on the handle. Whats nice about single stage batch loading is that for most of the process it is pretty much mindless and you can stop any time. IE resize a gazillion cases, flair them, prime them etc. Pay attention when powder charge and seating.

    With a progressive they are not that much faster than a turret unless one has a bullet and case feeder. A Progressive has a lot more going on at one time, is easier to screw up, harder to set up for calibers, primers, if a mistake is made harder to back up and start over, Main advantage is less pulls on the handle.

    The claims of output are "optimistic" IMHO. (400 to 600/hr???) Folks claim 300 to 400 an hour but neglect to say they deprimed and sized on another press. Then primed by hand. Never say how long that took
    I timed it several times with everything set up and ready to go, NO WAY I could approach even 300 in one hour paying attention as I always do. That pace would drive me crazy!
    NRA Certified RSO

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ratzo View Post
    Thanks for the replies. It seems that there is some time savings. My first thought was that handgun ammo is easy to reload. Just wander through the steps and out pops a loaded cartridge. What makes it tedious is the number of time you need to handle a case. Rifle on the other hand is technical and requires more care. I was glad to hear flip say that there is no flex in the turret. I would think flex there could cause inconsistent quality. Interchangeable turrets seem to be a bonus. I have two dedicated tool heads for 9x19 and .45 ACP for my Dillon. I’m not sure I would like the powder measure being jostled around while moving the turret though. It would seem to me that the potential for inconsistent powder charges would increase every time you move the turret and “settle” the powder.

    I don’t want anyone to think that this is a Dillon vs. turret thread. I was simply curious as to how they were used. It seem while they are not as fast as a progressive press, they are faster than a single stage. Thanks again for the input.
    Your logic is a lot like mine as to why I use a Lee Classic Turret press. First let me say I have nothing against Dillons or Lee presses. I started with Lee presses and stuck with them. Now that that’s out of the way, I have never liked the priming system on Lee Progressive presses. If there was a slow down or issue it was with the primer system. The primer system on the turret press is not automatic but fast and reliable. I already had a Classic Turret press so I dusted it off and now use it as described earlier. Since the Turret press caliber change is so easy I sometimes prime and prep two or more calibers and then run through the charging and finishing on another day. The net time per round is about the same but the charging, bullet seating and crimp goes faster. I also charge on the position in the front of the Progressive press which has a light so I can see the powder fall. So far no squibs due to no powder.

    The main reason I don’t have Dillons is the cost of the press and then all the accessories.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Minorcan View Post
    Your logic is a lot like mine as to why I use a Lee Classic Turret press. First let me say I have nothing against Dillons or Lee presses. I started with Lee presses and stuck with them. Now that that’s out of the way, I have never liked the priming system on Lee Progressive presses. If there was a slow down or issue it was with the primer system. The primer system on the turret press is not automatic but fast and reliable. I already had a Classic Turret press so I dusted it off and now use it as described earlier. Since the Turret press caliber change is so easy I sometimes prime and prep two or more calibers and then run through the charging and finishing on another day. The net time per round is about the same but the charging, bullet seating and crimp goes faster. I also charge on the position in the front of the Progressive press which has a light so I can see the powder fall. So far no squibs due to no powder.

    The main reason I don’t have Dillons is the cost of the press and then all the accessories.
    Whatever floats your boat mate...I’m a Hornady guy...but all good.

    Thewelshm
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  10. #19
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    "The main reason I don’t have Dillons is the cost of the press and then all the accessories."


    But Dillion Engineering has beautiful womens in their literature, Lee don't. Neither does Hornady, Redding or RCBS for that matter.

    Bet those babes don't reload....lol Least not brass cases.......
    Daryl......

    'You can fool some of the people all of the time, all of the people some of the time, but you cannot fool mom....

  11. #20
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    And the Ford, Chevy, Dodge conflict continues. And the winner is Dillon Blue by a full box ! !

    EDIT: On a Dillon or other progressive press the limit factor is refilling the primer tube. If I start with a full primer tube on the press, and 4 extra full tubes at the press, on my Dillon 450, I can reload 500 38 Spl rounds in about 70 minutes. Just once I reloaded 100 rounds in 8 minutes -- never again.

    On my Dillon 550, I've reloaded 425 rounds of 44 Mag in an hour but resizing brisk 44 Mag is much more work than resizing mild 38 Spl cases. Bulk rifle ammo with FMJ bullets is about 400 rounds per hour with either 223 or 308 brass. I start with tumbled brass, no crimped primers, and lubed brass that will not be too long when resized. After reloading the ammo goes in the tumbler to remove the case lube.
    Last edited by Engineer1911; 05-14-2019 at 10:11 AM.
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