Found a Unique to me 22 rifle
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  1. #1
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    Found a Unique to me 22 rifle

    Stopped in at a new Pawn Shop near me (too near) and saw this unique little 22 Rifle. Made by Hi-Standard for Sears-Roebuck with J.C. Higgins. It is a J.C. Higgins Model 30. Interesting as the bolt lever is on the left side while the shells eject on the right. Cleaned it and action is very smooth and the barrel is shiny and almost new looks like. Does have a retractable sling but spring is broken. Was able to find a new one and have it ordered. A little wear on the stock but is really a nice gun from 1951. The front sight is very easy to see. Below is an excerpt from the Sears sight concerning J.C. Higgins.


    Many people ask if there was a real "J.C. Higgins" who worked for Sears. There certainly was. John Higgins began working for Sears in 1898 as the manager of the headquarters' office bookkeepers and retired as company comptroller in 1930.
    "John Higgins" the employee became "J.C. Higgins" the brand name during a discussion in 1908 among Sears' executives of possible names for a new line of sporting goods. At this point, the story gets a bit murky, but Higgins' name was suggested and John Higgins consented to Sears use his name. Since he did not have a middle initial, Sears added the "C."
    In 1908, the Western Sporting Goods Company in Chicago began putting J.C. Higgins on baseballs and baseball gloves sold in Sears catalogs. By 1910, the J.C. Higgins trademark was extended to cover footballs and basketballs. Later, the popularity of the Higgins brand—combined with the wider participation of American youth in sports—led Sears to place tennis equipment, soccer balls, volleyballs, boxing equipment and baseball uniforms in the J.C. Higgins line.
    By the 1940s, J.C. Higgins represented all Sears fishing, boating and camping equipment. After the Second World War, Sears consolidated all sporting goods under the J.C. Higgins brand name and added it to a line of luggage.
    The J.C. Higgins brand disappeared shortly after Sears introduced the Ted Williams brand of sporting and recreation goods in 1961.

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    Regards,
    Rodney


    "To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead."

    Thomas Paine

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    My first gun was a new HJ. C, Higgins 22 single shot rifle that retailed for $10.88 and my first new (and only new one) was a J.C. Higgins that cost $36.88. We got everything from Sears Roebuck in the 50s and early 60s.
    Last edited by osbornk; 05-25-2019 at 12:32 PM.

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    My Remington 552 has a right port, left bolt
    jeepnut likes this.

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    Looks like a variation on the Winchester 77?
    "Supposin' I was to go to work and learn how to... to read writin'. Well, how'd I know that the feller that... that wrote the writin' was a writin' the writin' right? Here I might be just a readin' wrong writin', don't ya see?"
    [Festus Haggen]

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    Quote Originally Posted by Verminator View Post
    Looks like a variation on the Winchester 77?
    I am not sure as it does look a lot like it. But found out Winchester 77 was made from 1955 for a few years and Hi-Standard made these starting in 1950. Wonder who copied who?
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    Regards,
    Rodney


    "To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead."

    Thomas Paine

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeepnut View Post
    I am not sure as it does look a lot like it. But found out Winchester 77 was made from 1955 for a few years and Hi-Standard made these starting in 1950. Wonder who copied who?
    I don't know. The 77 was brought out as a part of the 100/88 big bore family but I've never heard who designed it. I had one as a kid. I see the safety is different.

    I'll try to take a look around the Winchester forums and see what happened there.
    jeepnut likes this.
    "Supposin' I was to go to work and learn how to... to read writin'. Well, how'd I know that the feller that... that wrote the writin' was a writin' the writin' right? Here I might be just a readin' wrong writin', don't ya see?"
    [Festus Haggen]

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    Quote Originally Posted by osbornk View Post
    My first gun was a new HJ. C, Higgins 223 single shot rifle that retailed for $10.88 and my first new (and only new one) was a J.C. Higgins that cost $36.88. We got everything from Sears Roebuck in the 50s and early 60s.

    So did my parents and I. Even got our first house from a Simpson Sears catalog. Back then Craftsman tools were the best. Made in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Too bad Sears succumbed to the demise of the one stop retail store death.

    I remember my mom's Kenmore washer. Dad fixed it whenever it broke. You could actually buy parts and on Saturday too. Had a real transmission with machined gears that ran in oil.

    Guess I'm nostalgic. I still have my mom's other washer, a Maytag wringer and I use it all the time. Has to be 70 years old. Mom wanted 'spin dry' so dad got her one but being a good war family, we kept everything.

    Still remember the clothes drying in the basement on the line in the winter, the stiff sheets and the wonderful smell of unscented Tide in the cloth. In the summer, they went on the line i the back yard. Smelled good there too. All the neighbors knew what you wore, it was always hanging out to dry....
    Hunter, jeepnut and ShooterGranny like this.
    Daryl......

    'You can fool some of the people all of the time, all of the people some of the time, but you cannot fool mom....

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    My dad had a JC Higgins 12 gauge pump shotgun, made by Hi Standard. I always thought it was the coolest shotgun with the ventilated rib and power pack choke assembly which looks like some kind of compensator. It looks like this Name:  27998905_1.jpg
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    jeepnut and WendyZXZ like this.

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    So true that Sears used to be true quality made items. That shotgun does look nice. Going to the range today so will let know how it still works.
    Regards,
    Rodney


    "To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead."

    Thomas Paine

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    I have very fond memories of the J. C. Higgins Model 30. As a teenager in the 1956-59 era I worked in a hardware store so I had a little money and it was my practice to buy a few boxes of 22 Long Rifle every Saturday and go to my Friend's house before going home. He was the proud owner of a J. C. Higgins Mode 30l and we made short work of the 22 ammo. The model 30 was faultless, accurate, 100% reliable, and a very good looking rifle. I would love to find an example and put it through its paces.
    Last edited by jimg11; 05-25-2019 at 08:10 AM.
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    Jim

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