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  1. #1
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    Polishing cylinder throats

    I was thinking about ordering a cylinder throat polishing hone for a couple of my revolvers. Has anyone done this before? Does it make a difference on extraction?
    "No people in the world ever did achieve their freedom by goody-goody talk and moral suasion: it being immutable law that all revolutions that will succeed must being in blood, whatever may answer afterward."
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    Re: Polishing cylinder throats

    I've been told polishing any chamber that may take a heavy load is a very bad idea. The brass no longer "grabs" the chamber wall and can cause higher pressures and/or blown cases.
    Instead of buying a hone, try a chamber filling brush with a patch saturated with JB Bore paste. Put it in a battery powered drill and then give it hell.
    As far as cutting a new forcing cone on one, S&Ws come with a 5 degree forcing cone I believe. They say an 11 degree throat is better overall. Some people even go to an 18 degree forcing cone but that is a bit much.
    You need the plug gauge to make sure you don't over cut one. If you do, your accuracy may go down the tubes.
    Personally, I use a Lewis lead remover on my revolver forcing cones ever so often so any wear on the cone doesn't build up to let the cone split like so many are supposed to do on the 357 K frames.
    Just my thoughts and worth what you paid for them.

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    Re: Polishing cylinder throats

    Are you just trying to polish the throats or the entire chamber? Throat work shouldn't make a difference in extraction I'd think as the throat is forward of the chamber.

    I have also heard it is not a good idea to polish the chambers, but have talked to some folks who have had their throats reamed to proper specs, resulting in greather accuracy (especially in Ruger 45 caliber pistolas).

    Why exactly are you wanting to do this?
    "Those who know how to build their own homes, grow their own food, hunt and slaughter animals for meat, and have a healthy balance of hope and cynicism for humanity will be the ones left at the end, not some 350 pound fatass with a cache of AR's."

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    Re: Polishing cylinder throats

    I want to get a little better extraction on a couple of my revolvers that I compete with. I noticed that my old .38 that I was using was a little sticky with a variety of different brass cases. These weren't heavy loads at all, mostly handloads only a hair above the minimum.
    "No people in the world ever did achieve their freedom by goody-goody talk and moral suasion: it being immutable law that all revolutions that will succeed must being in blood, whatever may answer afterward."
    Mark Twain

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    Re: Polishing cylinder throats

    I'd polish them with JB Bore Paste. Either with a mop or a patch over a brush in a variable speed drill.

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    Re: Polishing cylinder throats

    One thing that I do...is to clean the chambers on the cylinder thoroughly with a brass brush and solvent.......then run several patches through it. The expanded cases, after firing, will have less to "grab onto" in the cylinder......making extraction easier. Every time that you clean the barrel....clean the cylinder as well.

    Also, clean the extractor, extactor rod, and the internals of the cylinder. This will lessen the resistance to moving or rotating as the trigger is pulled in DA. Giving you a lighter trigger pull, also. Bob
    When you want the BEST! Bob

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    Re: Polishing cylinder throats

    Quote Originally Posted by David Lapell
    These weren't heavy loads at all, mostly handloads only a hair above the minimum.
    Are your cases pretty dirty with carbon after extraction? Could be that the cases aren't expanding enough to get a good seal on the chamber walls. I've experienced this when I was shooting cowboy action and mouse fart loads with 45 Colt. The cases were real dirty and the chambers were as well.

    You might just try loading them up a smidge more - maybe about mid-range until your cases start sealing. I'd expect you wouldn't notice the difference in recoil when you got to the point you need to.

    I've noticed that with hotter loads (in 45 Colt at least), the brass looks like it doesn't even need to be tumbled its so clean.

    Anyway, just a thought.
    "Those who know how to build their own homes, grow their own food, hunt and slaughter animals for meat, and have a healthy balance of hope and cynicism for humanity will be the ones left at the end, not some 350 pound fatass with a cache of AR's."

    SASS #43746R.O. I/II
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    Re: Polishing cylinder throats

    Get a Lewis Lead Remover and work on getting your cylinder chambers clean!
    That might help a lot!!!!!!


 

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