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Thread: FAQ

  1. #21
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    Re: FAQ

    Hand and Torsion spring

    Here is the basic set-up


    On the new MIM guns the hand spring is different. The pictures below is how it looks assembled. If it fly's apart, look at the pictures to aid you in reassembling it. Remember that there is a "blind" cutout area where the short side of the spring fits, inside the trigger. The other side of the spring gets bent behind the hand stud in the normal way and when all assembled it's fine. Remember, the spring fits on the side that the hand is positioned.




    YOKE ENDPLAY

    To adjust the yoke screw:
    Use a file and lightly file the bottom of the screw until the cylinder swings without a lot of resistance. I like them with a bit of drag, but not binding.

    If you tried the screws, then the yoke stud is too long (or the slot is worn) and needs to be adjusted.

    You need to flatten the button of the yoke. Find a 1 inch round bar (Babbitt bar would be nice) and place the yoke body on it. Using a hammer lightly tap the button (on the corner) to make it flatter, (peen only 1/2 way around) then if you need to, file out the slot where the screw fits so it can be tightened up. Only file what you have to, or it will be loose again. You're trying to narrow the slot opening where the screw goes (Look for the screw rub mark). Your not trying to move the whole 9 yards, just deform the slot.
    Tap lightly, check the fit often.







    Cylinder stop



    A cylinder stop is fit it to the cylinder first. You fit it to the smallest notch in the cylinder, and they will vary a little. Then you fit it to the trigger. Make sure that when the trigger pulls it down, that it does not pull the ball out of the frame window. If you leave it set where the ball drops below the opening, it can get offset to one side and hang up inside the frame.

    When originally fitted, the stop is timed so that at no time the top of the ball drops below the edge of the window in the frame. If it does, it can stick in the down position. So, they tend to not have them rise above more than they have to lock the gun. On the top of the cylinder stop right behind the start of the hook, is an adjustment step. By filing it down, you allow the cylinder stop to go further up through the window and engage the cylinder notches deeper. The adjustment step is for when it wears, you can adjust it. By having the stop rise a little more, it compensates for wear in the notches and locks the cylinder better. If that does not rise up high enough to lock the cylinder, then you will need to fit an oversize stop.

    When fitting an oversized stop, measure the width of the stop where it engages the cylinder and make sure you get one at least as wide. You can end up with an undersized stop that will be worthless to you.
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  2. #22
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    Re: FAQ

    Hammer Block Location

    When removing the side plate, some members get into a bind when something falls out.
    This slender bar is called the hammer block. When replacing the hammer block, it will sit exactly like the picture shown. All the way up on the rebound slide pin.

    This picture is of my 500, but the hammer block location is the same on ALL model revolvers.

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  3. #23
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    Re: FAQ

    INTERNAL LOCK REMOVAL

    Please review the earlier FAQ posts on complete detail stripping the revolver.
    Once your up to speed, lets remove the lock!

    J L N or X frame lock parts are all the same procedure.


    The first thing to do is remove the side plate and hammer to expose the lock.



    Now remove the bolt. Be careful, you have a tiny spring and plunger, which will fly off if your not careful. Pull the bolt up from the rear and lift it out of the frame. Then to make it look cool, I take the rebound block and trigger assembly out too. Lay it all a side.



    Carefully, lift the flag up, and at the same time unhook that tiny wire spring where it is attached to the frame. Here is a close up of the flag. Look carefully and you will see a tiny wire spring.
    Here is the Problem! If this spring is weak or if it breaks the gun jams up.

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  4. #24
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    Re: FAQ

    Continued from above:

    Now, back to the gun, I just use a dental probe and twist off the large coil spring. Once the spring is removed, slide the fork forward, at the time it clears the cylinder hole in the frame, push the cylinder out from the frame.





    You won’t need this any longer:




    To reassemble this IL is a tad harder to do. These parts are tiny! Here is how I do it.

    Place the coil spring and fork together. Slide it home onto the frame. Using that dental probe, push the fork forward, compressing the spring. Once you clear the hole in the frame, drop the cylinder in. (Look carefully at the cylinder, there is a notch where the fork fits into it, so the parts fit only one way).

    Then when the cylinder and fork are in, place the flag in that hole in the frame. Carefully flip the wire spring into the frame notch.

    Then put the bolt back on. Slip the front into the breech face and use a screwdriver and compress the bolt plunger and spring, press the bolt home into the frame.

    Then finish the reassembly from your previous readings in the FAQ.

    The owners of this site are not responsible for the removal or tampering of the lock. The info posted here, is for informational purposes only.
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  5. #25
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    Re: FAQ

    Smith & Wesson revolver terminology

    When discussing S&W revolver parts, it's best to know what each part is called when dealing with ordering or explaining problems. This is out of an old 29-2 owners manual. The part names haven't changed over the years.

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v508/ ... spage1.jpg

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v508/ ... spage2.jpg
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  6. #26
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    Re: FAQ

    LOCTITE REMOVAL

    If you ever run into a loctite product don't panic! You can still turn that screw or push that sight with a little know how.
    To disassemble Locktite, apply localized heat to the assembly to approximately 482 degrees Fahrenheit. Disassemble while hot (if it cools it will re-strengthen). Heat sources could be a butane torch or believe it or not, a toaster oven. (When removing gun sights, I throw the slide into the oven for a few minutes).


    Just for your concerns, aluminum will melt at around 1220°F while steel is much higher at around 2700°F. Don't worry about the heat treating, only the critical action parts are heat treated such as triggers or hammers and so on. (If the metal rods inside your toaster oven don't warp under the broil setting, your SW1911 slide will be just fine!)

    Have fun.
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  7. #27
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    Re: FAQ

    Test Hammer Spring

    First, make sure the hammer spring (main spring) is flat. Check this by removing it from the gun and laying it on the table. If it’s not flat, use a rubber mallet and tap it down.
    This is how I test the main spring: Always keep the strain screw tight. Then you hang weights off the hammer until the proper poundage is reached.

    You file the strain screw down to adjust the poundage to at least the minimum setting. Remember, the strain screw is always fully tightened, and the side plate is on when doing this work.
    Gun empty! (for 22 revolvers, put fired cases in chambers.)
    Dry fire gun and hold trigger fully to rear. (The muzzle is pointed straight up while you do this test).

    Cock hammer with thumb, then hook a weight around the hammer (3 1/2 LB min weight for 357. 3 ¼ LB for 38 special) I hang the weight with a piece of string looped on the end of the hammer.
    The hammer must not move rearward (further back under the weight) when the gun is lifted, while the weight is attached.
    The factory has heavy triggers because they don't need any accidental discharges or any extra lawsuits. Also the guns have rough spots that the heavy springs cover up. The guys putting them together don't care if it's done right or not either.

    Sometimes an extra long firing pin may help with poor ignition problems. But the spring must be right too.

    A “home” gun smithing way of reducing trigger pull: if you don't want to file down the screw, then using blue locktite (thread locker) back off the strain screw until the gun misfires, then go back in 1/4 turn.
    Some guys cut the main spring down by removing strips (long wise) to weaken it.


    With my guns, I always run full power main springs but put reduced power rebound springs to help with the double action trigger pull. This is the best way of keeping ignition yet having a lighter pull. As long the trigger resets quickly, the rebound spring is the correct one for your application.
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  8. #28
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    Re: FAQ

    Cylinder turn line

    The cylinder turn line is normal with Smith and Wesson revolvers. However, it can be adjusted where the line won't dig in or be extra pronounced if you have a highly buffed or engraved gun which the turn line could diminish it's cosmetic appeal.

    This is how to adjust it. Take the cylinder stop out of the gun. Use a grinding wheel, lightly round the left hand side of the stop about a 1/3 it's way across the top. In doing this "trick" it will have less bearing to rub on the cylinder, plus there are no sharp edges to dig into the cylinder as the cylinder is rotated. Remember only the left side is trimmed! Otherwise the timing will be altered...
    This is hard to photograph, but this picture will give you the idea what I'm trying to show.
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  9. #29
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    Re: FAQ

    FIX FOR ENDSHAKE

    You have 3 types of fixes for endshake.
    First way is peening the yoke barrel to stretch it. Some smiths do it this way.
    The 2ND way is using a tubing cutter sort of tool and squish the tube to stretch it. This is the S&W way.
    The 3RD way is the best way in my opinion. This way uses what they call endshake bearings. They are hardened stainless steel shims that fit inside the cylinder and add length to the yoke barrel.

    So, break down the cylinder and get the yoke off the gun.
    Now the first thing to do is clean up the bottom of the cylinder (that ridge inside, at the bottom of the cylinder), where the yoke sits on. The tool I use is a 3/8 endmill (or swap it for a dremel type stone if you wish) and rub the sides down to make the endmill safe (or stone safe) so it won’t cut on the inside diameter of the cylinder.
    Using a drill press, place the cylinder in a vise. Put the endmill in the drill chuck. Using the quill insert the tool inside the cylinder. Turn the chuck by hand (NO POWER) and clean up the bottom of the cylinder. You want to remove that ridge made by the yoke. Make the bottom of the cylinder look clean and flat.

    Now, turn your attention to the yoke, using a yoke squaring tool, trim the end of the yoke barrel so it is clean and square.



    This is a close up of what the yoke squaring tool looks like.


    So at this point all the mating parts are square, flat and clean. The bearings are ready to go in.

    That's it for the hard part. Now it's time to put it together and check it out. Add a few drops of oil on the bearings then place the desired amount inside the cylinder. Reassemble the cylinder on the gun and check your work. Ideal endshake is less than .002 inch.

    This “new way” won’t damage the yoke. If done properly, the repair will last for thousands of rounds.
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  10. #30
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    Re: FAQ

    How to straighten a bent extractor rod

    I don't do locktite, neither will the factory on extractor rods.

    There are several things to look at to determine what is causing the run out. It might be the rod that has an obvious bend to it. It might be the extractor rod collar that isn't parallel. It might be the thread portion of the extractor rod that is bent.
    Once you try and tighten it up, any reason above will cause the whole rod to run out, yet when loose the rod appears fine.

    This is how I adjust them. Find a lead/babbit bar. Anything will work as long as you don't flatten the threads or ding up the extractor rod. That is why something softer than the extractor rod will work. Chuck up the rod in a drill press chuck/ lathe chuck. I use an indicator, but a sharp eye will work too. As you roll the extractor rod around, tap the high side down. Get it to run straight. If you have an indicator set it for .001 run out.

    To determine if the collar is bad, you need to measure it is several places with a micrometer to see if it is made parallel. .001 out of square will cause the end to be out 1/32" or more at the tip of the extractor rod.

    Use a tool like this to tighten it up, not your fingers!



    Another way is to use leather straps in a vise to protect the extractor rod, and tighten it that way. Make sure you insert fired cases in the chambers to protect the alignment pins as you tighten it up.
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