making the trigger pull lighter on 686 & 617
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Thread: making the trigger pull lighter on 686 & 617

  1. #1
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    making the trigger pull lighter on 686 & 617

    Just how light can you go on the trigger return spring ?

    I like for springs to be as light as possible, and still perform their minimum functions.

    It appears to me that for double action work, the trigger only has to restore itself, and any spring action beyond that is superfulous.

    I realize that cleanliness plays a big part in minimum tension situations, but it isn't all that hard to squirt WD-40.

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    banger,

    As light as still will insure no mis-fires. CLP is preferred over WD-40.

    Mike

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    Thanks, Mike -- I like CLP for lube and bore cleaning, but have found WD-40 and hi-pressure air good for getting the grit and other loose particles out . . .

    I have an assortment of springs of all types, compression, tension, torsion, etc, and I think I'll pull the side plate on my 617 and mess around with it, properly labeling and keeping the original springs, naturally . . .

    What I specifically want to lighten is the cylinder lock, trigger, and hand springs . . .

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    banger,

    I found a LOT of good info in the Miculek trigger-job DVD from Midway. That, and Kuhnhausen's Shop Manual are good teachers. Injunbro and Sebago Son (forum members) are also fine mentors.

    Mike
    banger likes this.

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    I've repalced a 10, 65, and a 686 with Wilson Combat's #12, no problem, however, the same spring in a 17 feels rather sluggish.
    Last edited by Jorge Dominguez; 11-29-2011 at 09:28 AM.

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    You’ll simply deceive yourself tinkering with springs. Leave the revolver OEM until you’ve shot it extensively. I’ve spent a lot of time double action shooting K frames until the point that the cylinder notches were staring to peen/peened from the double action work. At that point you’ll be able to make an informed decision based on personal experience.

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    WD 40 was N-E-V-E-R designed to be used on firearms. Yes it will dry out a distributer cap that's why it's called W(ATER) D(ISPLACEMENT) but will also attract dust, grime, and unburned powder.

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    WD 40 will also cause rot in wood stocks, having seen several fine stocks ruined by it I won't let it anywhere near my guns. The proper way to lighten an action is to very carefully deburr & clean all of the action parts before messing w/ the springs. Most folks go about this backwards and all too often end up w/ fail to fire or push-off issues after the gun breaks in. There are plenty of us here who will gladly help walk you through a proper action job, all you need to do is ask. I'm living proof any 220 lb., fumble-fingered gorilla can do a good job.
    "He that hath no sword, let him sell his garment & buy one" Jesus - Luke 22:36

  10. #9
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    Good advice, Injunbro -- I'll leave the 617 alone 'till a few bricks of ammo have been run through it . . .

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    Shoot it "in" and it'll just get smoother. I recommend either "CLP" or "Gibbs" to keep it slick. (I prefer "GIBBS").


 

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