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  1. #1
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    What causes this?

    I found of few .44 Magnum cases that seem to have a crease in the base of the shell. There is no separation, but there is a fine line that you can easily see and feel. It appears on several cases that I found, Remington, Federal, and Norma. I don't plan on using these, I am just curious as to what caused this, I have never seen anything like it before.
    "No people in the world ever did achieve their freedom by goody-goody talk and moral suasion: it being immutable law that all revolutions that will succeed must being in blood, whatever may answer afterward."
    Mark Twain

  2. #2
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    Re: What causes this?

    If you try to reload those cartridges they will most assuredly be head separation.

  3. #3
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    Re: What causes this?

    My guess David is that there is a combination of an over sized chambers in the cylinder and /or a maladjusted resizing die.

    Incipient case failure is likely.....

    Drew
    ".... Evil Flourishes When Good Men Do Nothing...."

  4. #4
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    Re: What causes this?

    +10 to what Drew posted.
    For your own safety, call the brass recyclers and get those cases out of your loading stock!
    Don
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    NRA Life Member
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    RCA

    CCA

  5. #5
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    Re: What causes this?

    Were these found cases that you took home and resized with a carbide die? I'm always suspicious of found brass - particularly found magnum brass.

    I've seen this before. The cartridge has been fired in an oversized chamber and the carbide ring in the sizing die overworks the brass and swages up a tiny ridge of brass as the case is pressed into the die. The little ring can sometimes be prevented by lubricating the oversized brass with a tiny amount of sizing wax - allowing the carbide ring to slide freely over the brass without raising the ring. Some folks routinely lube brass meant for carbide dies anyway. I don't do this, but a squirt of Hornady One-Shot into a baggie full of brass usually does the trick.

    I had a Ruger .45 Colt with an oversized chamber that "ruined" all of my good brass like this. I have continued to shoot those cases with the little swaged ring many more times - for many more years in my Colts - with no problems. Eventually, some of those cases split longitudinally from old age - but I've never had a head separation. However, I make it a practice to load the hot stuff only in new or known first-class once-fired brass.

    BTW, a head separation occurs from the inside-out. You first notice it a a faint lightly-colored ring near the base - indicating stretched brass over a thinning area inside the case. A head separation won't show a raised ring on the outside. Here are a couple of near-separations on some old well-used .30-40 cases. Note how the rings swage inward into the cases - rather than raise up on the outside.


    xtm

  6. #6
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    Re: What causes this?

    Xtm that was very educational thanks. I learn something on this forum all the time.

  7. #7
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    Re: What causes this?

    A Case Seperation Can Ruin Your Entire Day....

    If I saw a case like this, magnum or otherwise, it would go right in the scrap bucket.

    Not worth the risk.
    ".... Evil Flourishes When Good Men Do Nothing...."

  8. #8
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    Re: What causes this?

    Let me clarify something....

    The raised ring caused by the carbide ring wouldn't really bother me if the case was from a known source and I knew exactly what caused it - but the little radial nick just above the raised ring would give me cause to wonder about an incipient head separation. I might be compelled to take a hacksaw and see for sure.

    When in doubt - throw it out!

    Head separations are a real PITA because they usually leave a piece of stuck case in the chamber and you have to figure out how to get it out without scratching up the bore and chamber. Modern firearms have gas vents or other means that direct gases away from your face, but some antique guns do not have this safety feature. Best be prepared and wear safety glasses anytime you shoot! If you shoot frequently enough, you're probably gonna have one or see one - they occasionally even happen with new factory rounds - particularly with foreign military stuff, so you need to be prepared. I once had a .303 Enfield that would have one nearly every time you pulled the trigger! I was with a friend when he had a head separation while shooting factory ammo in his Savage 99 chambered in .30-30. This was in the years before everyone sued for anything.... we concluded that the factory brass had not been properly annealed, and his chamber had slightly oversize headspace. No harm to him, but the gas was vented back into the head of the buttstock and split the wood. He's shot the rifle 100s of times before and after that incident with no problem - just with that one box of ammo.

    xtm

  9. #9
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    Re: What causes this?

    Imminent head separation, could be for several reasons but still ready to let go. When I see problems like that one I put the case on the anvil and give it a whack, Don't want any chance of letting it slip into good cases causing problems later.

    Boats

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    Re: What causes this?

    Oh, yeah, I know stuff, too. That's when the doo-hickey discombobulates causing the thinga-ma-jig to overcompensate for the whatcha-ma-callit when it engages the whizzer on the whirlygig. That's definately bad ju-ju. What you do is toss it in the circular file, cause it ain't no good no more.

    Ha! And y'all thought I was just an ignorant savage. That'll learn ya.
    The last Boy Scout.


 

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